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Tasmania Destination Information

Tasmania is an island and a state of Australia. Tasmania is located off the coast of Melbourne, and offers a wide range of attractions including national parks, wildlife parks and islands.

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  • Barrington Tops National Park

    Barrington Tops is surrounded by more than 80,000 hectares of national parks and state forests. Steep mountainsides are covered in ancient temperate rainforest, snow gums and gorges, waterfalls and fast flowing streams. Take the five-minute walk through lush, subtropical rainforest to the Williams River and swim in its deep, clear...

  • Battery Point

    Battery Point is Hobart’s most historic suburb, and is located a short walk from Salamanca Place and the waterfront via Kelly's Steps. Battery Point retains the character of a Cornish fishing village of the last century. It began life as a home for mariners who worked out of Hobart Town,...

  • Beaconsfield

    The small town of Beaconsfield sits on the western banks of the Tamar River in the heart of the Tamar Valley Wine Region. With a population of around 1,000 people the town's economy is focused around the revitalised gold mine. Beaconsfield is 40 kilometres (24 miles) north west of Launceston...

  • Bicheno

    Bicheno, just north of the Freycinet Peninsula on Tasmania’s stunning east coast, is known for its laid-back lifestyle and outdoor activities. If a holiday relaxing by white, sandy beaches, dining on fresh seafood and playing leisurely games of golf sounds appealing, you’ll love Bicheno. More than 700 people live in the town,...

  • Binalong

    The historic village of Binalong is nestled in wooded hills on the Burley Griffin Way, 320 kilometres south west of Sydney and 37 kilometres north west of Yass. Binalong is home to Australia's only purpose-built Motor Museum, Peter Minson's beautiful glass art at Southern Cross Glass and The Binalong History...

  • Bothwell

    Bothwell is the gateway to the central highland and was settled by Scottish pioneer farmers in the early 1820s. It has wide open streets, and lovely 19th century buildings. As you would expect it sits on the Clyde River, where Australia’s first herd of Aberdeen Angus cattle grazed, and,...

  • Bridport

    Bridport in Tasmania’s north east is a popular holiday destination overlooking Anderson Bay. Surrounded by bushland reserves, white sand and the sloping vines of Pipers Brook wineries, Bridport is an ideal place to unwind. The town’s population of 1,350 almost triples in summer when holidaymakers flock to the beach. ...

  • Bruny DEntrecasteaux Visitor Centre

    Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are staffed with skilled and knowledgeable locals who can provide expert travel information, itineraries and tour suggestions, as well where to go, what to see and where to eat. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres can also making bookings for you. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are located around the Island...

  • Bruny Island

    Wild seascapes, towering dolerite seacliffs and sweeping surf beaches, wonderful coastal walks, birdlife and wildflowers, tall forests and an historic lighthouse are all features of Bruny Island off the southeast corner of Tasmania. It is about the size of Singapore but has a population of around 500 people. Access...

  • Burnie

    Burnie overlooks Emu Bay, on the north-west coast. This proudly industrial city is Australia’s fifth largest container port and a vibrant place to visit. Burnie was once surrounded by dense rainforest, but this slowly disappeared as fortunes were made felling and milling timber. The paper and pulp mill on...

  • Burnie Airport

    Burnie Airport is located 19 kilometres (12 miles) north west of Burnie’s city centre. Burnie Airport is situated near the central business district of the nearby town of Wynyard. Access to Burnie Airport is via the Bass Highway, travelling through Cooee and Somerset to Wynyard. The Burnie Airport is serviced daily...

  • Burnie Visitor Information Centre

    Located within the magnificent tourism centre Makers’ Workshop in North West Tasmania, the Burnie Visitor Information Centre is a place to meet the locals and learn from them the special locations to visit on your journey. Let our helpful staff and volunteers assist you with bookings for accommodation and experiences,...

  • Campbell Town

    Campbell Town was one of the early coaching stops between Launceston and Hobart and sits on the banks of the Elizabeth River. It was named by Governor Lachlan Macquarie, after his wife’s family, during a visit in 1821. It was, and is, the centre of the sheep-farming region and is a...

  • Cockle Creek

    Cockle Creek, on Tasmania's southeast coast, is the most southerly town in Australia. The tiny seaside settlement of a few shacks 90 kilometres south of Geeveston is a quiet corner, ideal for a summer swim, picnic or campsite. It is also the beginning, or the end, of the South Coast...

  • Coles Bay

    The east coast village of Coles Bay sits beneath pink granite mountains at the entrance to Freycinet National Park. With a small permanent population of less than 200 people, the town caters to local and visitor needs. The Coles Bay area is one of our Island’s most popular holiday spots for...

  • Corinna

    Corinna is a tiny historic mining town set in rainforest on the banks of the majestic Pieman River in Tasmania’s west. You reach the town from a number of directions. The C249 Highway north from Zeehan is unsealed and when you reach the Pieman River you take the Fatman barge, which...

  • Cradle Coast

    Tasmania's north west coast is where you can forget the rat race and join the human race; it is understated not under-rated. Step into a bush studio where an international designer crafts fine furniture. Share a wine with a jeweller while he shows you his creations. Open an ordinary door...

  • Cradle Mountain

    Cradle Mountain’s jagged peaks are one of the most recognisable images of Tasmania’s wilderness. Cradle Mountain is at the northern end of the 161,000-hectare (397,840-acre) Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair national park, part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. The Park is 2.5 hours’ west of Launceston (144 kilometres/90 miles)...

  • Cradle Mountain Visitor Information Centre

    On the park boundary the visitor centre has an interpretive display, ranger station, park information, walker registration and up-to-date weather reports. Alpine weather changes rapidly always carry waterproof gear, even on summer day walks. There are many superb short walks from the centre and the Dove Lake car park, 14...

  • Currie

    Currie is on the west coast of King Island, north-east of mainland Tasmania. You are sure to feel its remoteness as you gaze at the Southern Ocean – next stop: Africa. Almost 800 people live in Currie, the commercial centre of the Island. Industries include fishing, farming, and harvesting bull...

  • Deloraine

    Deloraine, at the foot of the Great Western Tiers in Tasmania’s central north, is classified by the National Trust, and you’ll see why the moment you enter. The bridge, Bonney’s Inn and the Baptist Tabernacle are just a few of the historic features that give this riverside village its charm. Deloraine’s...

  • Derwent Bridge

    Derwent Bridge is located virtually at the geographical centre of Tasmania and is one of the most isolated communities in Tasmania. Situated halfway between Hobart and Strahan, the town is an ideal stopover to break the long journey. In a world fast losing its natural flora and fauna, Derwent Bridge...

  • Derwent Valley and Central Highlands

    The Derwent Valley takes its name from the mighty river that rises at Lake St Clair and includes rich farmlands, rural settlements named by Scots and Irish settlers, and rugged escarpments and forests. It’s a valley of tough pioneers, explorers, bushmen, dam builders and bush rangers. Their stories begin in...

  • Devonport

    Devonport sits the banks of the Mersey River and is Tasmania’s third largest city. It is one of the Island’s primary access points and home to the Spirit of Tasmania ferries. The city has a population of about 22,000 and is surrounded by rich, fertile soil that produces more than 40...

  • Devonport Airport

    Devonport Airport is located eight kilometres (6 miles) from Devonport's city centre. Access to Devonport Airport is via the Bass Highway, then take the Port Sorell Road and the Pardoe Road, turning left into Airport Road. Devonport Airport has full terminal facilities and services, including hire cars and shuttle buses to the...

  • Devonport, Cradle Mountain and the Great Western Tiers

    From the city of Devonport, port of the Spirit of Tasmania, to the rugged country towards Cradle Mountain, is a region of farming hamlets and historic buildings, beaches, forests, mountains carved by glaciers and fertile farmland. The backdrop to your travels is the Great Western Tiers, known to the Aboriginal people...

  • Devonport Cruise Terminal

    The Devonport Cruise Terminal is located four kilometres (two and a half miles) from Devonport's city centre. Devonport is centrally located in Tasmania's north-west, ideally located to explore the wilderness of Cradle Mountain National Park, tour some limestone caves, meet some of the native wildlife at nearby Narawntapu National Park, take...

  • Devonport Visitor Centre

    Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are staffed with skilled and knowledgeable locals who can provide expert travel information, itineraries and tour suggestions, as well where to go, what to see and where to eat. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres can also making bookings for you. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are located around the Island...

  • Doo Town

    Doo Town overlooks the southern end of Pirates Bay not far from the Port Arthur Historic Site. As you drive through Doo Town you will notice that the inhabitants have named their cottages, or shacks as they are known in Tasmania, with ‘Doo’ names. These interesting names include Thistledoo and Gunnadoo. The...

  • Dover

    Dover is not quite the southernmost town in Australia but it is close. The pretty, quiet fishing village sits at the head of Esperance Bay overlooking the islands of Faith, Hope and Charity, about 80 minutes’ drive south along the A6 Highway (83 kilometres/51 miles) from Hobart. Dover is the...

  • Dunalley

    Dunalley is a small fishing village south-east of Hobart en route to Port Arthur. It is located on a narrow isthmus that joins the Tasman Peninsula to the rest of Tasmania. You cross the Denison Canal, hand dug in 1905, which joins Frederick Henry Bay and Blackman Bay. The town...

  • Eaglehawk Neck

    Eaglehawk Neck is an uncommonly beautiful place. The isthmus is flanked by the calm waters of Norfolk Bay on one side and Pirates Bay opening onto the Tasman Sea on the other. The quiet village is the gateway to the many attractions of the Tasman Peninsula, including Port Arthur...

  • East Coast Escape

    A route that lets you explore fishing villages, penguin rookeries, vineyards, off-coast islands, National Parks, mountains and gorges. The renowned Freycinet Peninsula has Wineglass Bay, recognised as one of the world’s top beaches. Beyond Bicheno, the pristine beaches continue with names like Chain of Lagoons and Bay of Fires. Oysters,...

  • East Coast Tasmania

    Whether they are fishermen, wine makers or walking-guides, you will hear a different life story from friendly locals whose values are shaped by the rhythms of nature, and the stunning beauty of the east coast. At Mount William National Park, in Tasmania's north east, Forester kangaroos acknowledge visitors with casual...

  • Evandale

    Evandale is a Georgian village south of Launceston, best known for its 19th-century buildings and relatively untouched streetscape. The town, with a population of nearly 1,100, is only five kilometres (three miles) south of Launceston Airport. Every year, avid cyclists suit up in skin-hugging Lycra for a national championship road race. But...

  • Flinders Island

    Flinders and its 51 surrounding islands are all that remain of the land bridge that once connected Tasmania to mainland Australia. This is an island of dramatic and varied landscapes, from the pink and grey granite cliffs of Strzelecki and Killiecrankie to the gentle, green farmland that rolls through the northern...

  • Flinders Island Airport

    Flinders Island Airport is located five kilometres (three miles) north of Whitemark. Flinders Island airport terminal has lounge facilities, public telephone, and cold drinks available. Taxi and hire cars are also available at terminal. Regular air services operate from Melbourne and Launceston with Airlines of Tasmania. Charter flights also operate. The...

  • Freycinet and the East Coast

    Tasmania’s east coast is a coast of contrast - sunshine and sea life, wine and wildlife, crags and beaches, history and adventure. It’s a coast of national parks - Douglas-Apsley, with its quietly flowing rivers, eucalypts and Oyster Bay pines; Freycinet, a bushwalkers’ and sea kayakers’ paradise; and Maria Island,...

  • Friendly Beaches

    Spectacular views, miles of unspoiled white sand beaches, and low-key camping by the sea are the main features of The Friendly Beaches, which were added to the Freycinet National Park in 1992. Gravel roads lead to car parks overlooking the beaches. Basic camping is permitted at Isaacs Point and Ridge Camp,...

  • Geeveston

    Geeveston is the administrative centre for the timber industries and apple growers of south eastern Tasmania. It is 62 kilometres (39 miles) south west of Hobart on Highway A6, and is the gateway to the Arve River forests and Hartz Mountains National Park. In the town centre you will find...

  • Geeveston Visitor Centre

    Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are staffed with skilled and knowledgeable locals who can provide expert travel information, itineraries and tour suggestions, as well where to go, what to see and where to eat. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres can also making bookings for you. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are located around the Island...

  • George Town

    George Town sits on the eastern banks of the Tamar River about 40 minutes’s drive (50 kilometres/32 miles) north of Launceston. It is the third oldest settlement in Australia after Sydney and Hobart. At nearby Low Head you can explore one of the best-preserved examples of an early pilot...

  • George Town Visitor Centre

    Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are staffed with skilled and knowledgeable locals who can provide expert travel information, itineraries and tour suggestions, as well where to go, what to see and where to eat. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres can also making bookings for you. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are located around the Island...

  • Glenorchy

    A few kilometres upstream of Hobart the ajoining city of Glenorchy, in Tasmania's south, is a family destination with natural and culinary delights. From chocolate to wine to the world-renowned Museum of Old and New Art (MONA), a ramble along the Derwent foreshore to bush hikes in Wellington Park, you are...

  • Greater Hobart

    Greater Hobart, including the cities of Clarence and Glenorchy as well as the town of Richmond, is an intriguing blend of heritage and lifestyle, scenery and vibrant culture. It’s a city defined by the river and sea. Take a harbour cruise, or drive to the summit of Mount Nelson...

  • Great Western

    Great Western has played an important role in Australia's winemaking history, with grapevines first planted in the area in 1863. Wine continues to be the town's drawcard, with a tour to some of Australia's best-known wineries a must for any visit to the Grampians region. Call into the historic wineries and...

  • Great Western Tiers Visitor Centre

    Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are staffed with skilled and knowledgeable locals who can provide expert travel information, itineraries and tour suggestions, as well where to go, what to see and where to eat. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres can also making bookings for you. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are located around the Island...

  • Greens Beach

    Approximately 60 kilometres (37 miles) north-west of Launceston and at the mouth of the Tamar River lies Greens Beach, a take-off point for Narawntapu National Park. Narawntapu National Park has three access points at Bakers Beach, Badger Head and Greens Beach. The latter has to be the best reward for least...

  • Heritage Highway

    The history of the Heritage Highway region is intrinsically linked to the extraordinary road builidng that occurred in Van Diemen's Land in the first half of the 19th century. An overland route through the Midlands was pioneered by the Surveyor General, Charles Grimes as early as 1807; remarkably it is the...

  • Heritage Highway Visitor Centre

    Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are staffed with skilled and knowledgeable locals who can provide expert travel information, itineraries and tour suggestions, as well where to go, what to see and where to eat. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres can also making bookings for you. Tasmanian Visitor Information Centres are located around the Island...

Other Listings

This Tasmania destination information map displays tourism business locations in your chosen region, area, city or township. Click on a Tasmania map location icon to display more information.

For more listings please click:    1 | 2 | 3 [>>]

Related Visitor Information Categories: [Destination Information] [National Parks] [Sports, Rugby and Cricket Training]


 

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